Removing Work Instructions from Procedures: Maintaining an Effective IATF 16949 Quality Management System

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IATF 16949: 2016
Creation, Implementation, Maintenance and Improvement

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Presenter: Michael Wolfe, IATF 16949: 2016 Auditor and expert, McDaeGroup

(Note: Please send any questions related to the IATF: 16949 to info@nimonik.com anytime before October 31, 2017. The expert will answer the questions after the presentation on a first come first served basis)

 

The 3rd in a series of 4 articles

One of the biggest disappointments I encounter when auditing most Quality Management Systems is the incorrect and ineffective collusion between a company Procedure and their Work Instruction. To maintain a healthy and effective IATF 16949 QMS, a company must protect the intended scope of documented procedures.

Procedures are nothing more than documented information that support the operations of a Process (IATF 16949 4.4.2). In other words procedures describe who does something, and when it is done. Companies need to avoid the pitfall of including specific detailed information on how each step in the procedure is done, that is the role of a Work Instruction.

Let’s suppose a company decides to implement a Corrective Action Procedure that follows the 8D format. In this case the procedure can simply point to each one of the 8D’s. For example, consider the steps below:

• Identification of a nonconformance

• Initiate a Corrective Action Report (CAR)

• Take containment actions if applicable

• Assign the appropriate personnel to take steps to correct the immediate problem

• Investigate the root cause

• Take action(s) to prevent the recurrence of the nonconformance

• Evaluate the implemented actions to determine their effectiveness

• Complete and close the CAR

Procedures should not include detailed information on how to complete each section of the CAR (that should be contained on the actual CAR form), specific ways on how to investigate the root cause (that should be done through employee training), how to evaluate the effectiveness of the actions taken (should be done by training auditors), and should not include a comprehensive list telling how to contain the nonconformance (that should be in Work Instructions).

The most effective way to document a procedure is in the form of a 1 or 2 page flow chart. The time has come to have a funeral for the old fashioned procedures that are 10+ pages of paragraphed based dissertations that require a PhD to understand, let alone follow.

In closing, I would like to dispel the popular myth that the more thoroughly documented and detailed a procedure is the more effective it is. In reality, the opposite is true. The more complicated and specifically detailed a procedure is the more employees “disengage” from it. The simpler a procedure is, the more the employees are willing to engage in it and follow it. Bloated procedures create burdensome red tape that handcuff employees who simply want to use their skills and experience to do their job with excellence.

Remember, less is more. To have an effective IATF 16949 QMS, implement lean and mean procedures and allow employees to do what they know how to do…execute.

To receive a free analysis of your current Quality Manual email getstarted@mcdae.com

Michael Wolfe is a Standards Implementation Consultant that specializes in creating and implementing simple yet thorough Quality Management Systems that are both audit and user friendly and yield impressive improvement results in a variety of industries to a variety of standards. For more information visit www.mcdae.com.

Free Webinar

IATF 16949: 2016
Creation, Implementation, Maintenance and Improvement

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Presenter: Michael Wolfe, IATF 16949: 2016 Auditor and expert, McDaeGroup

(Note: Please send any questions related to the IATF: 16949 to info@nimonik.com anytime before October 31, 2017. The expert will answer the questions on after the presentation on a first come first served basis)